Welcome to the #1 FREE ASVAB Practice Test

Thank you and congratulations on your decision to join the Armed Forces!

Welcome to the #1 FREE ASVAB Practice Test Site. The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery or ASVAB exam can be challenging for some. You needn’t worry however, because we are here to help you pass and continue on your career in the military! Trust us, you really can pass with a high score which will help you pick the job you want. Some of the best ways to prepare for the ASVAB are using an online study guide, taking an ASVAB practice test from a book, or refreshing your skills using one or many of our FREE study tools. You’ll find all the tools you need right here to help you prepare for the ASVAB.

Exam Topics

The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) test is different depending where and why you take it. It contains nine different sub-tests, though they are not all created equal. The four most important sections of the ASVAB are Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Arithmetic Reasoning, and Mathematics Knowledge. Why? Because these four sub-tests make up the Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT), which determines if you qualify to enlist in the military at all. The other five tests help determine your personal strengths and what specific military jobs you may qualify for. Scoring of the ASVAB and can be complex. Raw, standard, percentile, and composite scores all work together to show how well you did on each of the nine sub-tests. Your AFQT percentile score is used to determine how trainable you may be or what jobs you may be qualified to perform. Different branches of the military have different AFQT score requirements. For example, if you have a high school diploma and want to join the Army you must have a minimum AFQT of 31, whereas to join the Coast Guard the minimum is 40. Re-testing policies vary amongst branches, though all do allow it under different circumstances.

Word Knowledge

No matter what branch of the military you’re considering, communication and language skills are essential. The better language skills you have, the better you can communicate with others. As you advance in your career, word knowledge will help you articulate what you want and will help you better understand what is expected of you by others. If you take the paper version of the test you will have 11 minutes to answer 35 questions, whereas on the computerized version you have 8 minutes to answer 16 questions.

Paragraph Comprehension

If you’re reading an instruction manual and can’t understand what it’s trying to tell you, what good is it? The military loves paperwork, so it is in your best interest to be able to read information and comprehend what it says. In the ASVAB test, most paragraphs you read will range between 50-200 words. In our ASVAB practice test paragraph comprehension section we have a similar set-up so you can get a feel for what the real test will be like. If you take the paper version you will have 13 minutes to answer 15 questions, whereas on the computerized version you will have 22 minutes to answer 11 questions.

Arithmetic Reasoning

The Arithmetic Reasoning section contains math word problems that you probably encountered in school. These problems help you apply math to the real world, and require you to both comprehend what the question is asking and solve a mathematical equation. You will not be allowed to use a calculator but you will have scratch paper and pencil. If you take the paper version you will have 36 minutes to answer 30 questions, whereas on the computerized version you will have 39 minutes to answer 16 questions.

Mathematics Knowledge

The Mathematics Knowledge section covers basic arithmetic, geometry, and algebra. If you take the paper version you will have 24 minutes to complete 25 questions, whereas on the computerized version you will have 20 minutes to answer 16 questions.

General Science

This section covers a broad range of subjects, from Earth science to biology, chemistry, and health. Because there is so much information contained in the section, it is best to review general principles rather than trying to memorize specific facts. If you take the paper version you will have 11 minutes to answer 25 questions, whereas on the computerized version you will have 8 minutes to answer 16 questions.

Electronics Information

This section aims to measure your knowledge of electricity and how it is used in the real world. A good grasp of basic math and algebraic principles is helpful if you want to score well in this sub-test. If you take the paper version of this test you will have 9 minutes to answer 20 questions, whereas on the computerized version you will have 8 minutes to answer 16 questions.

Auto and Shop Information

The questions in this section will test your knowledge of basic automotive functions and malfunctions, as well as the purpose of different tools and fasteners. If you take the paper version of this test you will have 11 minutes to answer 25 questions, whereas on the computerized version you will have 7 minutes to answer 11 questions on Auto Information and 6 minutes to answer 11 questions on Shop Information.

Mechanical Comprehension

Many jobs in the military require the use of machines, whether you are an engineer behind the scenes or a gunman on the front-lines. This section measures your knowledge of simple mechanical operations and mechanical physics. If you take the paper version of this test you will have 19 minutes to answer 25 questions, whereas on the computerized version you will have 20 minutes to answer 16 questions.

Assembling Objects

This section measures your ability to visualize spatial relationships, or determine how pieces of something should fit together. Spatial skills such as reading maps and graphs are important in the military and in everyday life. If you take the paper version of this test you will have 15 minutes to solve 16 problems, whereas on the computerized version you will have 16 minutes to solves 25 problems.